Read Vicky Rideout's response to the Atlantic's article, "Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation," on the London School of Economics' blog Parenting for a Digital Future. "The distinction between correlation and causation is not a mere technicality to acknowledge before moving on to a pre-ordained conclusion; it is fundamental to a correct interpretation of the work." Read the blog >

 

The next wave of the Common Sense Census: Media Use Among 0-8 Year-Olds (2017).  We'll survey more than 1,000 parents to measure young children's access to and use of media, including television, touchscreens, computers, e-books, print, apps, and video games - and we'll look at the newest media such as Virtual Reality and virtual assistants (think Siri, or Alexa). And we'll track trends in screen use since the last study in 2013. 


Given the variety of activities children can undertake on their phones and tablets, does it even make sense to talk about "screen time" any more?  And in this transmedia world, how can we effectively measure children's media usage - or should we even bother to try? 

Read Vicky Rideout's commentary in the Journal of Children and Media on why it does make sense to continue doing our best to measure the time children and teens spend with various types of media, using quantitative, nationally representative, probabilistic samples - despite the many challenges of doing so.  The article includes lots of key data from the recent Common Sense Census: Media Use By Tweens and Teens, now available in an academic journal. 

 

danah boyd puts the 'spotlight' on Vicky Rideout in the International Communications Association's newsletter for the Division on Children, Adolescents & Media 

read the interview >

Watch Politico's behind-the-scenes video about Barack Obama's 2004 Democratic Convention speech, including an interview with Vicky Rideout, director of speech writing for the Convention. 

Study: No screen-time war in young kids' homes
Most parents of children 8 and younger aren't concerned about media use, NU report says
June 3, 2013
In the popular press, much is made about how new digital technologies such as iPads and smartphones are revolutionizing family life. Children and parents alike now have a growing stream of new technological resources at their fingertips, offering increased opportunities for engagement, entertainment, and education. But while anecdotes about families and media abound, empirical evidence on national trends is much harder to come by. This study explores how parents are incorporating new digital technologies as well as older media platforms into their family lives and parenting practices. Read More >

Digital Literacy and Citizenship:  The Teacher’s Perspective
This survey snapshot for Common Sense Media surveys teachers regarding how they assess their students’ digital skills. Download Survey >

Children, Teens and Entertainment Media: The View from the Classroom
October, 2012.  Read the New York Times story on the national survey of teachers we directed for Common Sense Media, about how teachers view the impact of entertainment media on students’ academic skills and social development.   Download the full report or visit Common Sense Media’s research library for more of their work.  

Social Media, Social Life:  How Teens View Their Digital Lives.  June 26, 2012.  Read the new study we directed and wrote for Common Sense Media, about how teens think social media impacts their social and emotional well-being. Download Report >
Download Infographic >

Consumer Research: The NO MORE Project
VJR Consulting directed consumer research for The NO MORE Project, designed to create a new symbol – think AIDS ribbon or Livestrong bracelet – to represent concern about domestic violence and sexual assault.  We organized focus groups of teenagers and young adults, African American and Hispanic women, and young men, in New York, San Jose and Atlanta.  And we oversaw an online survey to test specific concepts.  Click here to learn more about the project.

Children, Media, and Race: Media Use Among White, Black, Hispanic, and Asian American Children
This report documents differences in the role of media in the lives of White, Black, Hispanic, and Asian children in the United States: which types of media they use, how much time they spend in various media activities, which media platforms and devices they own, and what the media environment is like in their households. The data presented here are the result of new analyses of two data sets, breaking out the findings by race and ethnicity: the 2010 Kaiser Family Foundation Generation M2 survey of media use among 8- to18-year-olds, and the Foundation’s 2006 survey about media use among children age six and under (The Media Family).

Historically, scholars have been aware of differences in the amount of time that White and minority children spend with media, especially TV. But last year’s Generation M2 study indicated a large increase in the amount of time both Black and Hispanic youth are spending with media, to the point where they are consuming an average of 13 hours worth of media content a day (12:59 for Blacks and 13:00 for Hispanics), compared with about eight and a half hours (8:36) for White youth, a difference of about four and a half hours a day. In recent years, this gap in media use between White and Black youth has doubled, and between White and Hispanic youth it has quadrupled. Read More >

Zero to Eight: Children’s Media Use in America
Having an accurate understanding of the role of media in children’s lives is essential for all of those concerned about promoting healthy child development: parents, educators, pediatricians, public health advocates, and policymakers, to name just a few. The purpose of this study is to provide publicly accessible, reliable data about media use among children ages 0 to 8, to help inform the efforts of all of those who are working to improve children’s lives. Read More >