The 10th Anniversary special issue of the Journal of Children and Media (JOCAM) is here!  Called JOCAM NEXT, the issue includes forward-looking pieces about the future of research on children & media, from some of the leading thinkers in our field. Link to the special issue here - articles are free to download, for a limited time. 

Also included is Vicky Rideout's commentary on why it makes sense to continue doing our best to measure the time children and teens spend with various types of media, using quantitative, nationally representative, probabilistic samples - despite the many challenges of doing so.  The article includes lots of key data from the recent Common Sense Census: Media Use By Tweens and Teens, now available in an academic journal. 

 

danah boyd puts the 'spotlight' on Vicky Rideout in the latest issue of the International Communications Association's newsletter for the Division on Children, Adolescents & Media  - read the interview >

 A study with the Joan Ganz Cooney Center and Vikki Katz (Rutgers),  for the Gates Foundation, about digital equity, focusing on use of technology among low- and moderate-income families.  (February 3, 2016)

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A study with Kevin Clark (George Mason University) and Kimberly Scott (Arizona State University), also for the Gates Foundation about access to, use of, and attitudes about digital technology among African-American youth and their parents. (Fall, 2016)


October 2015:  Participated in a panel discussion with Professor Craig Watkins at a strategic planning retreat for the Board of Directors of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

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October 2015:  Facilitated a session at the National Academy of Science's colloquium on Digital Media and Developing Minds in Irvine, California, which brought together neuroscientists, developmental psychologists, child development experts, pediatricians, media effects specialists, social scientists, experts in informatics and computer sciences, public health and environmental health scientists, educators and child advocacy groups to develop a common research agenda.

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March 2015:  Presentation to a National Academies of Science workshop on changing behavioral health social norms.  Presentation focused on evaluationing the effects of health content embedded in the popular entertainment television show show Grey's Anatomy. Watch the workshop here.
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October 2014:  Presentation about trends in digital media use among young children, and the ongoing importance of the digital divide, at the Digital Kids Summit. Watch a video of the presentation here 

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July 2014:  Panel presentation at the Casual Connect conference in San Francsico.  Read the article "Vicky Rideout Believes in the Power of Media," or watch the panel video here.
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June 2014:  Luncheon speaker at the Association of American Publishers conference Content in Context.  

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March 2013:  Participated in a panel discussion with Participant Media, The Ad Council, and others at SXSW Interactive in Austin. Topic: Content integration for social causes. Listen to Podcast >
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July 2012:  Spoke at The Aspen Institute Children’s Forum, on a panel about video games and health.
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May 2012:  Served on The Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention, in collaboration with HBO’s series The Weight of the NationRead the Committee’s reportwatch the HBO specials, or read the New England Journal of Medicine’s commentary on our Committee’s recommendations.


Study: No screen-time war in young kids' homes
Most parents of children 8 and younger aren't concerned about media use, NU report says
June 3, 2013
In the popular press, much is made about how new digital technologies such as iPads and smartphones are revolutionizing family life. Children and parents alike now have a growing stream of new technological resources at their fingertips, offering increased opportunities for engagement, entertainment, and education. But while anecdotes about families and media abound, empirical evidence on national trends is much harder to come by. This study explores how parents are incorporating new digital technologies as well as older media platforms into their family lives and parenting practices. Read More >

Digital Literacy and Citizenship:  The Teacher’s Perspective
This survey snapshot for Common Sense Media surveys teachers regarding how they assess their students’ digital skills. Download Survey >

Children, Teens and Entertainment Media: The View from the Classroom
October, 2012.  Read the New York Times story on the national survey of teachers we directed for Common Sense Media, about how teachers view the impact of entertainment media on students’ academic skills and social development.   Download the full report or visit Common Sense Media’s research library for more of their work.  

Social Media, Social Life:  How Teens View Their Digital Lives.  June 26, 2012.  Read the new study we directed and wrote for Common Sense Media, about how teens think social media impacts their social and emotional well-being. Download Report >
Download Infographic >

Consumer Research: The NO MORE Project
VJR Consulting directed consumer research for The NO MORE Project, designed to create a new symbol – think AIDS ribbon or Livestrong bracelet – to represent concern about domestic violence and sexual assault.  We organized focus groups of teenagers and young adults, African American and Hispanic women, and young men, in New York, San Jose and Atlanta.  And we oversaw an online survey to test specific concepts.  Click here to learn more about the project.

Children, Media, and Race: Media Use Among White, Black, Hispanic, and Asian American Children
This report documents differences in the role of media in the lives of White, Black, Hispanic, and Asian children in the United States: which types of media they use, how much time they spend in various media activities, which media platforms and devices they own, and what the media environment is like in their households. The data presented here are the result of new analyses of two data sets, breaking out the findings by race and ethnicity: the 2010 Kaiser Family Foundation Generation M2 survey of media use among 8- to18-year-olds, and the Foundation’s 2006 survey about media use among children age six and under (The Media Family).

Historically, scholars have been aware of differences in the amount of time that White and minority children spend with media, especially TV. But last year’s Generation M2 study indicated a large increase in the amount of time both Black and Hispanic youth are spending with media, to the point where they are consuming an average of 13 hours worth of media content a day (12:59 for Blacks and 13:00 for Hispanics), compared with about eight and a half hours (8:36) for White youth, a difference of about four and a half hours a day. In recent years, this gap in media use between White and Black youth has doubled, and between White and Hispanic youth it has quadrupled. Read More >

Zero to Eight: Children’s Media Use in America
Having an accurate understanding of the role of media in children’s lives is essential for all of those concerned about promoting healthy child development: parents, educators, pediatricians, public health advocates, and policymakers, to name just a few. The purpose of this study is to provide publicly accessible, reliable data about media use among children ages 0 to 8, to help inform the efforts of all of those who are working to improve children’s lives. Read More >